WHY I LOVE (AND HATE) SANDRA BROWN

WHY I LOVE (AND HATE) SANDRA BROWN

Let’s start with the quick and easy one:  I hate Sandra Brown (www.sandrabrown.net)  because she has fifty million of her dad-blamed books in print!  (Please don’t ask me how many of mine are in print).

I hate her because she’s more successful as a writer than I’m sure I’ll ever be and has a worldwide following of millions of readers.  My worldwide following is…well, we won’t go into that.

Clearly, my followers and fans need to start spreading the word!  So please post reviews of Catch a Falling Knife on Amazon and email and tell everybody you know about the book.  (Only if you like it, of course).  Then maybe someday I’ll catch up to Sandra Brown.  Except she’s written something like sixty books so, at my age, I’ll have to stumble onto the fountain of youth to equal that.

So, why do I love Sandra Brown?

First, she’s one of the warmest, most genuine people I’ve ever known.  She has a mountain house near mine and, along with my sweet wife Patti, and her good-guy husband Michael, I’ve hoisted a stem or two of wine with her and done a little singing around a mutual friend’s piano in the wee hours.

In every encounter I’ve had with Sandra she has flashed that personality of hers which is equal measures of foxy and pure Texas classy – a powerful combo with her cover-girl looks.  But it’s her core behavior that makes me love her.  You have to beg that woman to talk about herself.  Every time I see her she only wants to know about me and my writing career and how she can help me.

Another reason I love Sandra Brown is that I recently had a book signing in the mountains where I spend my summers and guess who walks in the door of Shakespeare & Company Bookstore?  Yep, Sandra.  Before I knew it, she had bought Catch a Falling Knife (I would have bought her a copy) and presented it to me for my signature.  In fact, here’s a picture of that.

Yet another reason I love Sandra Brown is she and I discovered that we share the same favorite fictional villain: Henry Faber from Ken Follett’s Eye of the Needle, one of the top thrillers of all time.  That’s important because my just released book, Catch a Falling Knife, is eerily similar to Eye of the Needle.  Not by design, of course, it’s mainly because the identity of my protagonist and antagonist, along with their respective objectives, are known early in the book after which they are on a collision course.  I am told that Catch a Falling Knife’s villain, Vincent Fabrizio, while certainly not modeled after him, is reminiscent of Follett’s Faber.  He’s a ruthless killer with an ice cold heart.

Or is it so cold?  Like Faber, he proves to be susceptible to love and tenderness and  has qualities which make readers find themselves – begrudgingly – almost liking him.

Finally, I love Sandra Brown because she is a good and decent person.  How do I know that for sure?  All you have to know is this:  Whenever she does one of those maddening “questionnaire” interviews, and is asked the person she most admires, she always gives the following answer: “The soldier who, after watching newscasts fed from the States, still goes out and fights a war for us.”

Yes, I love Sandra Brown.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s